Thursday, September 08, 2011

Knowing Your Place










Did Radnorian miss something?

While he was hiding out at Lloches Lewsyn (see new header pic) did some subliminal message broadcast by the BBC cause irreparable damage to the brains of his fellow countrymen?

How else to explain the above effort (click to enlarge) from a site purporting to be the National Museum of Wales? You can check out the original here. If you wish you can click on the cymraeg tab in the top right hand corner to discover that not only did someone write this nonsense, someone translated it as well. I'm assuming the English version is the original.

There you go, whatever, shakes head, returns to cave.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Checks calendar. Not April 1st. Retreats in bewilderment.

old radnor said...

Retreats in bewilderment ... sounds like an apt title for a history of modern day Wales.

Anonymous said...

Am I missing something? So far as I can see, this article is a factual account of the current and historical position of the English language in Wales. The article is one of a series of such articles which sets out the position of the various languages spoken in Wales, Cymraeg included of course. Perhaps I'm being a bit thick.

old radnor said...

Well I suppose it depends on your point of view but some of us don't consider Monmouthshire to have ever been over the border in England.

Anonymous said...

Ah I see your point now Old Radnor. On first viewing, I think I read Shropshire for Monmouthshire. That would have made far more sense.

old radnor said...

Yes Shropshire would make sense.

Of course the English Democrats went to the expense of putting up candidates in Monmouthshire recently on the somewhat legally tenuous Monmouth is English platform. I guess the actual legal position after the Acts of Union was that all of Wales was part of England, so there was no border at all.

I seem to remember reading that there was a time during the 19C when the only legal recognition of a separate Welsh identity came from the United States Immigration services.

alan o'r Bont said...

Another incorrect generalization is that the whole of the Gower Peninsular became English speaking. The population residing in the southern part, it is true, have spoken English for centuries but the northern part remained Welsh in speech and character. The famous women cockle pickers of Penclawdd would not have spoken anything but Cymraeg to each other!